I-924A Resources

USCIS has kindly shared IPO Deputy Chief Julia Harrison’s Talking Points IIUSA and AILA Conferences October 2016. There isn’t any breaking news here, but I’ll repeat Ms. Harrison’s first point. “Regional Centers: Don’t forget to file your Form I-924A between October 1 and December 29.” All Regional Centers that were designated as of September 30 this year must file this annual report.

I-924A Resources for Regional Centers

Go to the USCIS website for the Form I-924A and Instructions: https://www.uscis.gov/i-924a. Note that there’s a significantly revised version this year, so don’t reuse last year’s form. USCIS gives additional guidance for completing the form in I-924A Filing Tips (2015) and I-924A Q&A (2011).

The deadline for I-924A filing this year is December 29, but plan to file by December 22 if you want to avoid the new $3,035 filing fee.

Remember that I-924A stakes are high. This form is at the center of an annual review in which USCIS reassesses whether each RC can keep its designation. In preparing to file, consider what we know about the review process. Form I-924A goes to the IPO Compliance Unit at USCIS, which takes the following steps.

  • IPO reviews the info provided in the I-924A for timeliness, accuracy, and completeness
  • IPO considers the Form I-924A responses (and any supplemental narrative and exhibits filed with the form) to determine whether the RC is fulfilling its basic mandate to promote economic growth. If the RC does not have investment or jobs to report in the Form I-924A, IPO will look to see whether the RC makes a compelling case for future activity and mitigating circumstances. (“For example, it is reasonable to provide greater flexibility to a regional center with a more recent USCIS designation whereas a regional center with a longer period of designation that has not shown any economic growth to the geographic area, may receive less flexibility. In addition; the regional center’s progress in developing actual projects should be taken into account, including the steps taken to identify and pursue developmental projects, how the projects have progressed in the pipeline, and the likelihood of those projects promoting economic growth in the immediate future. Moreover, USCIS may consider any reasonable, temporary delays, such as natural disasters or litigation, which may have prevented the regional center from promoting economic growth in a timely manner, and any alternative plans or actions taken as a result of unexpected delays. This flexibility, however, is not an open-ended allowance in which the regional center can indefinitely explore potential projects or remain stagnant on either a hypothetical or actual plan.” See RC Designation: Use it or lose it )
  • IPO checks the numbers and claims reported in the I-924A against other info that it has on file for the RC, and red flags any inconsistencies
  • IPO performs an Internet search and searches internal databases looking for derogatory information related to the RC and its projects and principals
  • IPO investigates the RC’s online presence (the RC’s website, online content from agents and promoters) and looks for any impropriety. IPO particularly looks for use of the DHS seal or USCIS signature; any claims about guaranteed returns, guaranteed approvals, or expedited treatment of petitions; and any language (including entity names) that implies a special relationship with USCIS, DHS, or the US government. Keep in mind Cautions on Names of Regional Centers and Enterprises, and Unauthorized Use of DHS Seal.
  • IPO will issue a Notice of Intent to Terminate if the RC fails to submit required information, or if IPO determines based on its I-924A review that the RC no longer serves the purpose of promoting economic growth, and no longer remains eligible for designation. 70 RC have been terminated so far (54 in 2015/2016 alone), so this is not an idle threat.

(My sources: EB-5 stakeholder meetings on 8/13/2015, 9/17/2015, 2/3/2016; AAO termination appeals in 2015 and 2016; and FOIA material)

A regional center that hasn’t been active and doesn’t see future prospects may consider taking this chance to proactively withdraw from the program, instead of waiting to be terminated.  The recent Fee Rule says that “A regional center may elect to withdraw from the program and request a termination of the regional center designation. The regional center must notify USCIS of such election in the form of a letter or as otherwise requested by USCIS. USCIS will notify the regional center of its decision regarding the withdrawal request in writing.”

About Suzanne (www.lucidtext.com)
Lucid Professional Writing provides writing and editing services for businesses and scholars, and specializes in assisting clients to prepare business plans for filing with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

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