Constructive IIUSA response to bridge finance and other challenges

During the Q&A period at the EB-5 stakeholder meeting on November, 7, 2017, Carolyn Lee questioned IPO Deputy Chief Julia Harrison about recent adjudication of the bridge financing policy.

[transcription of time 01:01:27 – 01:10:11]
Ms. Lee: …We are concerned because we have been seeing what we think is a pattern of adjudications where qualifying bridge finance structures structured under the current written policy manual appear to be found to not qualify. …This comment is directed to urge you to please ensure that your examiners are trained on this policy, and are applying it correctly, because we have seen some very troubling NOIDs in this respect.

Ms. Harrison: Yes, thanks for that. I appreciate that you’re getting NOIDs that … there’s always going to be times when maybe we don’t agree. That happens. But if you are seeing something where you feel we may have messed up, follow the standard protocols to do the formal response. You can send an email to our customer service box and say we would appreciate it if the leadership team would take a look at this. It’s really hard for us… I mean I could take that back and have conversations with my team and say “Are you guys having some challenges with bridge financing? Have we done something different?” And they would all say “no.” Right, because they’re doing what they think is the right thing to do. And maybe they are. But it’s really hard for me to really kind of take a look into that unless you send me some examples. So I don’t want you guys to all flood me. Don’t go crazy. But, if you have a couple that you think are good examples of where you think we’ve gone astray – I’m not saying I’m going to agree with you, but I’m going to have some conversations with my team.  Please, though, do not take that as instruction to not follow the formal process.

Ms. Lee: Absolutely. Can we take that as an invitation to some sort of dialogue on these very complex issues?

Ms. Harrison: We can’t do that. We can’t go crazy. We can’t have a dialogue. [Laughs] We don’t want to violate any of the FACA rules. But, I will take a look at it and discuss with my team.

Finally after seven months, the industry has followed up on this exchange with a letter from IIUSA to USCIS regarding Major Issues Facing the EB-5 Industry. The letter starts by reopening the possibility of dialogue by addressing what FACA does and does not prohibit, and goes on to analyze six specific bridge financing challenges, as well problems associated with processing delays, third party guarantees, project financing structures, site visits, and redeployment.

This letter exemplifies what we should do regularly: respond constructively to misunderstandings at IPO with solid and documented clarifications based on our collective knowledge and resources. If examiners at IPO know little about bridge financing beyond what’s in Black’s Law Dictionary, and make incorrect determinations accordingly, that’s partly our fault. They have tough jobs and can’t be expert in every area of law and finance. The industry does have a comprehensive array of expertise, if only we organized to share it. IIUSA was late drafting this letter, and even later involving industry, but the product is solid. Anyone struggling with challenges to financing agreements and structures can use and build on this letter’s in-depth analysis. And I hope USCIS listens to the important points about processing delays, site visit missteps, and ambiguity around redeployment.

About Suzanne (www.lucidtext.com)
Suzanne Lazicki is a business plan writer, EB-5 expert, and founder of Lucid Professional Writing.

2 Responses to Constructive IIUSA response to bridge finance and other challenges

  1. AB says:

    “because they’re doing what they think is the right thing to do”

    This is hilarious. “They” are not being paid to do what they think is the right thing to do. “They” are being paid to follow the manual.

  2. Excellent letter by IIUSA.

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